Thursday, January 15, 2009

Flowers, Trees, Bushes; Questions and Answers

On this page at natureinfo.blospot.com, you can ask questions (such as when to trim your trees), give feedback, or share wonderment over your flowers, trees, bushes, etc. (For example: I take my geraniums inside every year, instead of throwing them away as so many others do. They thrive throughout the winter, and if they're in a sunny location, even bloom.)

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8 Comments:

At 1:30 PM, Blogger Darlene said...

My new friend Sandy, in Germany, makes insightful observations and shares her depth of knowledge in a personable style. She also has lots of links to other informative sites. I urge you to visit her at Pollenatrix.

 
At 1:03 PM, Anonymous Sherrie said...

HI Dar, I love Butterflies, and Know there are a few bushes and flowers that especially attract them......but have forgotten which ones are the best. If you are in the know, please let me know. Now with spring here, I am very excited to do some colorful plantings. Love Sherrie Rae

 
At 5:40 PM, Blogger Darlene said...

Before I start, thought it would be useful to know for distinguishing between the two, MOTHS rest with their wings spread, while BUTTERFLIES fold them up. Okay, WHAT FLOWERS ATTRACT BUTTERFLIES? I have an affinity for native prairie plants. My absolute, infallible choice, for sure get some PURPLE CONEFLOWERS (echinacea). Last year the monarch butterflies were sparse in the U.S. because they had trouble in Mexico again, but haven’t heard of anything this year. COMMON MILKWEED (asclep ias syriaca) is great, too. Monarch caterpillars feed on the leaves, & the butterflies seek the nectar. Also try the bright orange-flowered BUTTERFLY WEED (asclepias tuberosa), which is in the milkweed family. GREAT BLUE LOBELIA (lobelia siphilitica) and its red version, CARDINAL FLOWER (lobelia cardinalis) attract monarchs, swallowtails, etc. Then there’s BEE BALM (monarda didyma), with several varieties, and WILD BERGAMOT (monarda fistulosa). The two are related. Try some BLAZING STARS (liatris), including GAYFEATHER ( liatris spicata). I get frequent visitors to my JOE-PYE-WEED (eupatorium purpureum), and yes, GOLDENROD (solidago). The culprit causing allergies is Ragweed pollen. Goldenrod pollen is too heavy to be carried by the wind. BULL THISTLES (cirsium vulgare)may be a true nuisance, but their rosy-purple flowers are beautiful, and they attract butterflies, bees and goldfinches. Even good old-fashioned ALFALFA, thanks to a farmer who let me transplant a few sprigs to my yard, works, and I’ve heard that LARKSPURS or DELPHINIUMS are a treat for butterflies and moths. I just planted some GOLDEN ALEXANDER (zizea aurea) because a friend of mine recommended it, but warned me that it’s self-seeding, so it spreads, and some OREGANO. I’ll have to monitor them when they bloom. PHLOX, DAISIES and BLACK-EYED SUSANS are winners, too. There are many others, but I've only included plants that work for me. From my yard to yours, may our visits from butterflies be bountiful.

 
At 5:52 PM, Blogger Darlene said...

Nature lovers, please DON'T USE PESTICIDES OR INSECTICIDES in your yards. Not only do they harm plants, but butterflies and insects such as bees that help pollinate our plants, which are so vital for our ecosystem. Also, NIX THOSE MOSQUITO ZAPPERS if you don't want to kill pollinating insects, too.

 
At 3:37 PM, Anonymous Sherrie said...

Dear Dar, Thank you so much for all the wonderful bushes you listed for me to plant to attract butterflies of different types. You had mentioned that the Monarch's were scarce last year, however, I had a few in my yard, and have had some each year for a long time now. They are so huge and wonderful;about 3 yrs. ago, one landed on MY chest for a few seconds. I was so surprised by this. My husband said it means Good Luck! Well, am off to pick out some bushes . Happy plantings to all. Sherrie

 
At 8:48 PM, Blogger Floridacracker said...

Orange cosmos seems to be a real general attractant down here on the Florida frontier. I have a variety that reseeds itself and attracts a wide host of insects, not just lepidoptera. A friend gave me the seeds years ago. It seems to be more attractive to insects than my store-bought Sensation variety cosmos.

 
At 11:55 AM, Blogger Darlene said...

When is the best time to trim your MAPLE TREES? Actually, anytime. In the spring and summer, the sap is running up, so this may cause more "bleeding," while otherwise the sap is running down, but either way is safe. Never trim OAKS in the spring or summer, though!

 
At 12:34 PM, Blogger pb said...

We never see many flowers on our wisteria. Any suggestions for pruning(s)?

 

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